For COVID-19 vaccine updates, please review our information guide. For patient eligibility and scheduling availability, please visit VaccineTogetherNY.org.

Advanced cancer caregiving as a risk for major depressive episodes and generalized anxiety disorder.

Advanced cancer caregiving as a risk for major depressive episodes and generalized anxiety disorder.

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsTrevino KM, Prigerson HG, Maciejewski PK
JournalPsychooncology
Volume27
Issue1
Pagination243-249
Date Published2018 Jan
ISSN1099-1611
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Caregivers of advanced cancer patients provide extensive care associated with high levels of caregiver distress. The degree to which cancer caregiving increases caregivers' risk for a psychiatric disorder is unknown. The current study examines whether advanced cancer caregiving poses distinct risks for initial and recurrent major depressive episodes (MDEs) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) relative to the general population.

METHODS: Caregivers of advanced cancer patients (N = 540) from Coping with Cancer were compared to general population controls (N = 9282) from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. The general population comparison sample was propensity-weighted to be demographically similar to the caregiver sample.

RESULTS: Caregivers of advanced cancer patients were more likely than individuals in the general population to have an initial MDE (OR = 7.7; 95% CI, 3.5-17.0; P < .001), but no more likely than the general population to have a recurrent MDE (OR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.6-2.1; P = .662). Caregivers were also more likely than the general population to have GAD (OR = 3.0; 95% CI, 1.9-4.8; P < .001) and comorbid MDE and GAD (OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.9; P = .038).

CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk of meeting diagnostic criteria for current MDE and GAD and comorbid MDE and GAD associated with advanced cancer caregiving highlights the degree of emotional burden among cancer caregivers. Clinical services that assess, prevent, and treat depression and anxiety in cancer caregivers are needed to reduce the burden of caregiving and improve the mental health of this growing population.

DOI10.1002/pon.4441
Alternate JournalPsychooncology
PubMed ID28426918
PubMed Central IDPMC5746474
Grant ListR35 CA197730 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
K23 AG048632 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 CA106370 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH063892 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
U01 MH060220 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States

Weill Cornell Medicine Center for Research on End-of-Life Care 525 E 68th St, Box 39,
1414 Baker Pavilion
New York, NY 10065 Phone: (646) 962-9910